Final Exam Review: Forces

Pre-reading: Set a ten-minute timer and try the practice test below.

Click here for the practice test.

Answers and Explanations (Video):

Another Review video:

For more study:

Read Princeton Review chapter 3 (pages 37-56 — yes, all of it).

Practice test with explanations:

Princeton’s practice test on pages 52-55

  • Multiple choice: All of them (1-10)
  • Free Response: All of them (1-4)

You can check the answers and get explanations for the correct answers on pages 367-373.

More videos (if you want them):

Newton’s First Law

Newton’s Second Law:

Something to think about:

Using the image above, try to describe (in words) what happens to M1 as M2 falls.  Don’t just say it moves forward. Think about what goes on with its motion. Also, consider Newton’s Second Law (Fnet = ma).

Then, think about what happens to M1 when M2 hits the ground. Think about how M2 hitting the ground might affect the forces in the situation. How might it affect the acceleration(s)?

Finally, for a real challenge, try to calculate the velocity of M1 when M2 hits the ground. Assume the position of M2 in the picture is the starting place (otherwise known as the position at t=0). Yes, you will have to use kinematics. Yes, kinematics will show up on tomorrow’s exam.

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Final Exam Review: Kinematics

Textbook Reading: Walker Chapter 2 review (p. 45-47), Chapter 3 review (sections 3-1, 3-2 and 3-3 on pages 74-75) and Chapter 4 review (101-103).

Princeton: Take the practice test on pages 31-34 of the Princeton Review book.  Then, check your answers on pages 362-366 of the review book AND MAKE SURE YOU UNDERSTAND HOW TO GET THEM!

Pre-reading question: Conceptual question 13 on page 43.

Videos:

Supercram:

From me:

Example Problem:
(Repeated from a previous lesson)

Post-reading question: If you run 300 meters north and 400 meters east, what is your displacement? Be sure to include direction, since displacement is a vector.

Extra Practice:

Projectile Motion Review

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Optics Unit Exam Review

Princeton Review

  • Chapter 16 (309-342)
    • Try all Free Response and Multiple Choice questions (answers on pages 426-429)
  • Chapter 17 (343-359)
    • We did not cover the “Wave-Particle Duality Section” (349-35) — There could be a (one) question on the AP exam about it, so it is worth a read.
    • Try all Free Response and Multiple Choice questions (answers on pages 430-432)

Videos:

Not from me:

START at 2:40

STOP at 2:13

From me:

Pre-Spring Break Quiz

Final hints for the test

—————————————————————————–

Extra review stuff:

What you were supposed to learn in the plane mirror lab:

Want more?

These videos provide more detailed review if you want a little more…


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10.16 Nuclear Decay

Video only. No WSQ.

Video:

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10.15 Source of light and energy levels

Pretty long video so nothing else — only the video.

Video:

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10.13 Ray Diagrams

Videos:

Review: rules for ray tracing

Worked example for convex (converging) lens: Pay more attention to what he does than to his explanation. He uses some strange terms for the rays he draws, but you should be able to easily match what he’s doing to the rules I gave you.

 

WSQ 

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Introduction to Light Rays

Long-ish video, so no WSQ.  However, there WILL be a reading quiz about this video tomorrow.

Extra Practice:

Extra Practice

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Thermodynamics – Spring Break Assignment

Start here. Note that this video comes up again at the end.  You DO need to watch it twice.  You have been warned! Bwahahahahaha!

Next, read “Introduction,” “Temperature Scales,” “Physical Changes Due to Heat Transfer,” “Calorimetry I” and “Calorimetry II” on pages 157-159 of the Princeton Review book. Try example 9.1, and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this

Calorimetry and latent heat

Next, read “Thermal Expansion” on pages 159-160. Try example 9.2, and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this:

Thermal Expansion

Next, read “Heat Transfer” on pages 160-161. Try example 9.3, and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this.

Heat Transfer – Radiation

Next, read “Kinetic Theory of Gases” and “The Ideal Gas Law” on pages 162-164. Try examples 9.4, 9.5, 9.6 & 9.7 and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this

Ideal Gas Law example problem


Next, read “The First Law of Thermodynamics” on pages 166-173. Try examples 9.10, 9.11, 9.12, 9.13, 9.14 & 9.15 and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this:

First Law example problem

Next, read “The Second Law of Thermodynamics” and “The Carnot Cycle” on pages 173-176. Try examples 9.16 & 9.17 and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this

Heat Engine example problem

Next, read “The Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics” on pages 165-176. Try examples 9.8 & 9.9 and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this one again (yes, again!)

Now you have reached the only assignment due for credit:
Work this problem as if it were a whiteboard problem, drawing diagrams and explaining where necessary. If you need help, the last video is most like this problem.  If you still need help, scroll down to the quiz review material.

Problem:

Draw out the PV Diagram for the scenario below and it will help you answer the problems.

A gas starts out at Point A at 400 K. This gas is also initially at a pressure of 1 x 10^5 Pa and a volume of 0.001 m^3. The gas begins to expand (increase volume) isobarically to Point B until it reaches a volume of 0.004 m^3. The gas then contracts (decreases volume) isothermally to Point C until it reaches the original volume of 0.001 m^3. The gas then finally decreases its pressure isovolumetrically back to the original pressure of 1 x 10^5 Pa at Point A.

  1. Calculate the temperature at Point B.
  2. Determine the temperature at Point C.
  3. Calculate the pressure at Point C.
  4. Determine the internal energy (Delta U) for the process from B to C.
  5. Determine the work done on the gas for the process C to A.
  6. Calculate the work done on the gas for the process A to B.
  7. What does the area under the entire cycle in the PV diagram give you?
  8. Is the heat (Q) absorbed or released for the process of C to A?
  9. Calculate how many moles of gas there are (use R = 8.31).
  10. If you could have one superpower, what would it be?

There will be a quiz the first day back from the break!

Here is some extra material to help you study:

  1. Read the summary on pages 181-182 of the Princeton book.
  2. Try the problems on pages 177-180, and check your answers on pages 402-405
  3. Read this review sheet.
  4. Watch this video:
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10.10 Snell’s Law Practice

Video: 

WSQ 

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More thin film info

Video:

I found the first few minutes of this video confusing, but by the end it all comes together in a pretty nice way.

WSQ 

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