Thermodynamics – Spring Break Assignment

Start here. Note that this video comes up again at the end.  You DO need to watch it twice.  You have been warned! Bwahahahahaha!

Next, read “Introduction,” “Temperature Scales,” “Physical Changes Due to Heat Transfer,” “Calorimetry I” and “Calorimetry II” on pages 157-159 of the Princeton Review book. Try example 9.1, and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this

Calorimetry and latent heat

Next, read “Thermal Expansion” on pages 159-160. Try example 9.2, and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this:

Thermal Expansion

Next, read “Heat Transfer” on pages 160-161. Try example 9.3, and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this.

Heat Transfer – Radiation

Next, read “Kinetic Theory of Gases” and “The Ideal Gas Law” on pages 162-164. Try examples 9.4, 9.5, 9.6 & 9.7 and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this

Ideal Gas Law example problem


Next, read “The First Law of Thermodynamics” on pages 166-173. Try examples 9.10, 9.11, 9.12, 9.13, 9.14 & 9.15 and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this:

First Law example problem

Next, read “The Second Law of Thermodynamics” and “The Carnot Cycle” on pages 173-176. Try examples 9.16 & 9.17 and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this

Heat Engine example problem

Next, read “The Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics” on pages 165-176. Try examples 9.8 & 9.9 and make sure your solution matches theirs.

Now, watch this one again (yes, again!)

Now you have reached the only assignment due for credit:
Work this problem as if it were a whiteboard problem, drawing diagrams and explaining where necessary. If you need help, the last video is most like this problem.  If you still need help, scroll down to the quiz review material.

Problem:

Draw out the PV Diagram for the scenario below and it will help you answer the problems.

A gas starts out at Point A at 400 K. This gas is also initially at a pressure of 1 x 10^5 Pa and a volume of 0.001 m^3. The gas begins to expand (increase volume) isobarically to Point B until it reaches a volume of 0.004 m^3. The gas then contracts (decreases volume) isothermally to Point C until it reaches the original volume of 0.001 m^3. The gas then finally decreases its pressure isovolumetrically back to the original pressure of 1 x 10^5 Pa at Point A.

  1. Calculate the temperature at Point B.
  2. Determine the temperature at Point C.
  3. Calculate the pressure at Point C.
  4. Determine the internal energy (Delta U) for the process from B to C.
  5. Determine the work done on the gas for the process C to A.
  6. Calculate the work done on the gas for the process A to B.
  7. What does the area under the entire cycle in the PV diagram give you?
  8. Is the heat (Q) absorbed or released for the process of C to A?
  9. Calculate how many moles of gas there are (use R = 8.31).
  10. If you could have one superpower, what would it be?

There will be a quiz the first day back from the break!

Here is some extra material to help you study:

  1. Read the summary on pages 181-182 of the Princeton book.
  2. Try the problems on pages 177-180, and check your answers on pages 402-405
  3. Read this review sheet.
  4. Watch this video:
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